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appointed by john paul ii and benedict xvi. the growth in the catholic church these days is in latin america. is in asia and is in africa. will they go outside europe and possibly choose a pope from one of the other church is growing? that's one of the questions a lot of people are asking today. >> the author of the pew book evangelical catholicism, deep reform in the 21st century church. got a copy here. just hot off the presses. to write this book you deeply reporting and, of course, you have known pope benedict xvi for 23 years since he was cardinal ratzinger. tell us about this process, first of all, the decision which, as you have said and others, this comes from great humility. >> it's a real reflection of the character of the man. this is someone who has never thrust himself into the public eye. he is shy scholar. he is extraordinarily lucid mind, and if he decided in conscience and prayers, as he put it together, that he could not give the church the service the church deserved, then i think we ought to take him on face value at that. in this book evangelical catholicism, i describe
, he watched as a close advisor and close friend, john paul ii, in his last years as pope, and he saw not only the angst that john paul ii went through during that time of suffering, but he also saw how the vatican works when there's a pope that's not able to at his full capacity to do his job. something he obviously had in mind in the past that he could do it. it's very surprising he did. >>steve: father jonathan are you suggesting that the pope saw pope john paul ii in his declining years and said the people of the catholic community need a pope who's at 100% or as close to it as possible, so if i ever get to that stage i'm going to call it quits, and that's what he's doing? >> you know, it seems that that is a big part of his decision. we know how close he was to john paul ii. keep in mind, though, the pope is not a manager. this is why it's so shocking. the pope is not first and foremost the manager. he's the defender of the faith, protecting or guarding the teaching of the church and of the gospel. so you don't need somebody who is a stellar manager at his full capacity necessari
is going to resign his position. the end of the month. and, you know, he succeeded john paul ii who has rushed to make a saint. wrongly so, i think. not that he doesn't deserve it. you need some time. also the pope has said this is not the first -- not the first pope to retire. popes can retire. we are used to popes dying in. right? and most of them have. but a little quick research as we were getting ready to come on the air which is why i am not fully in uniform yet this morning. i will take care of this right now, the last pope i could find to resign was pope gregory xii. >> i don't remember him. >> bill: you wouldn't. back in the 15th century around 1415 or so there have been maybe a half a dozen popes to resign. he is the last one i could find. >> wow. >> yeah. there are a lot of explanations out there on twitter, supposedly for the vatican sort of indirectly saying it's for health reasons. he doesn't have the strength to serve in this role any more. so we don't know exactly what that means. there were rumors when he would resign when his butler wa
to function. even john john paul ii. what is it about this pope that he decided to step down? >> i think there are a couple of things going on there. with john paul ii he knew he was dying. i don't think benedict is so seriously ill that he's going to die but he could -- you know, live for another 10 years. he's got an older brother. and being in the papacy and not to be up for the job. so i think he decided that it was best for the church to go at this point and let someone else carry the burden. >> bill: now as "the new york times" says, the church is at a crossroads in the sense that where the church used to be strong, it is not so much anymore and it is in a developing world in africa and in south america and in asia where the church is showing great growth. what does that say about a future pope? >> well, there's two theories here. one is you go and find somebody from africa where the church is truly growing. on the other hand, the other theory is no, you look for someone who can deal with the problems of the church, where it has real big problems, namely europe where it is in decli
not been the most popular pope. he followed in the footsteps of john paul the ii who was such a global superstar. upon his departure a lot of people are feeling that they didn't really know what they would be missing. they've come to appreciate his cerebral intellect, his kindness, his gentle necessary and we spoke to gregg burke a short while ago, here is what he had to say about today. >> it's sad to see the pope leave saint peters, but on the other hand it's beautiful to see the pope happy and at peace. you can tell he is somebody who has been struggling physically. to think okay i'm not baggy to have all this weight on my shoulders is beautiful. >> gregg of course, one of our colleagues now working at the senior communications adviser for the vatican, very much in tune of what is going on and talked a lot about the serenity the pope is feeling now. there will be a short ceremony with the swiss guards. you may have seen footage of them colorfully dressed. that is the papal protection squad and the pope will board the helicopter to castle gandolfo where he will become pope emeritus a
to meet the pope then john paul the 2nd. then what happened happened and my mother found herself representing bill clinton to the pope. >> how exciting for her. >> it was a challenge. >> i guess it was. >> e.j. this morning quotes somebody who says the most noted earnize i earnizing -- modernizing thing this pope did was to retire, get out of the way. could it be at this modern age a pope just can't afford to be seen frail and weakened in the 24/7 news cycle? are we moving beyond the days? >> i don't think that's necessarily true. john paul felt strongly he wanted the world to see him in a sickened state because that was humanity. that he was setting an example of someone who was frail and feeble and carrying on. i think this pope, you know, has decided to set a different example. we'll see what this precedent means. does it mean future popes have to be pushed out? does he have influence after a new pope is manamed? we're in unchartered waters. >> and in quite a while, we'll see -- >> they have their own camp david. >> with the choicloisted nuns. they'll probably get better food.
for -- as someone put it, i think -- a cardinal who is the secretary of pope john paul ii is now the archbishop of poland. they said, why didn't he resign when he was old in sick, he said, he continue come down off the cross. there is a lot to be said forbearing one's burden to the end. but i do think that it's been hundreds of years since the last pope resigned. i wouldn't be surprised if we saw it happen again in the next hundred years. his resignation i think in service of the church has actually said this is an act of humility. people talk about how can one give up such a big and important and powerful position, i think there is also another way that this is humble, it's not lost upon the pope that in stepping down it may be perceived that this is an act of weakness or abandonment and i think that probably in many ways for this man, being sort of the kind, gentleman he is was probably more difficult for him than walking away from all the trappings of the papacy. jenna: your quick thoughts on the legacy he leaves behind. >> there are two things he'll be remembered for. one it's bringing the
on the mission of the papacy. pope benedict is 58 years old. he became pope in 2005 after the death of john paul ii. there is no information as to when a conclave to elect a new pope will begin though it will not happen until after the pope's resignation date. the last pope to resign was way back in the 1200s actually major headline out of rome. pope benedict xvi is resigning. we'll have much more on this coming throughout the morning. >>> talk about our weather now from mississippi to maine. it will be a day of cleaning up after mother nature. the deep south took a direct hit from a tornado on sunday. at the same time, the northeast is still digging out after a blizzard dumped as much as three feet of snow. what a mess up there. and it will still be kind of canadiansy the rest of the week too, right? >> well, potentially. have you to wonder because so far this winter, we have abeen kind of just getting by. >> skirting it. >> it has been very close. you have to wonder when mother nature will deliver one. it looks like a few chances for winter weather later this week. for this morning, just some
who make the pilgrimage here buy all sorts of le -- religious souvenirs. many still have pope john paul ii. the election of the new pope is also expected to bring an economic boom to rome. >> we're increasing all our services. social services. all of our security. >> reporter: 4 million pill pilgrims came for the last conclave in 2005. the city of rome is getting ready for the same number this time. at the vatican, danielle nottingham, wjz eyewitness news. >> and the vatican acknowledged for the first time that pope benedict hit his head in a hotel room during a trip to mexico last year. church officials say the accident has nothing to do with the pontiff's decision, though, to retire. >>> still ahead on eyewitness news. not a bad man. why two of ex-lapd christopher dorner's final victims say they felt compassion for their captor. >>> i'm bob turk in the first warning weather center. after a warmer friday, more wintry precip is possible. i'll have the exclusive first warning five-day forecast. >>> and here's today's cold, cough and flu repor
john paul ii back in 1981 said he was following orders from iran's. >> the weapons were from a group that called for an end to the u.s. military presence found on a vessel intercepted in january. >> he was observed operating erratically and low in the water. so a routine boarding was conducted. arms were discovered. we had crew statements that indicated the point of origin was iran. >> beyond yemen, a new british report concludes iran has been expanding its footprint in africa by secretly supplying unmarked ammunition like the shipment uncovered in lagos in 2010 to fuel regional conflicts. the report describes iran's role in the sudan as sustained and potentially escalating. fox news is told that an israeli strike on the sudanese warehouse in objecting was linked to the iran smuggling operation. the head of the house intelligence committee who receives regular briefings on iran. >> it's to escalate arms flow. why, they're feeling the pressure of sanctions. >> while tehran denies involvement, this week authorities link last summer's bus bombing that killed 5 aisraelfiveisraeli tourist
for somebody who will continue the intellectual, the pass storm mission of john paul the 2nd and benedict the 16th. who will be in alignment with them and their cardinals from europe, north america, latin america and africa that can do that very well. jenna: like all popes, really in the position of great power. there is also criticism that sometimes is levied upon someone with such a responsibility. i'm just curious when you reflect back over these last several years with pope benedict, what do you think is important when you look ahead to who is chosen for the next pope but not only for the leadership of the church but a religious leader, a spiritual leader for the world? >> i think one of the great challenges is reconciliation among people of different faiths of integrity, of spirituality, of purifying the church. this has been a great concern of pope benedict and i think his successor will be of the same mind, that, the people have to folk discuss on the person of jesus christ as christians, the work of charity and brotherhood. jenna: mr. anderson, so nice of you to join us today. we
, communication travelquickly, ri i know that during the life of john paul ii, towards the end while he certainly gave us an example of endurance and perserverance, pope benedict xvi was watching those last years of his life and seeing important work of the church not get done and he said, i don't think, at least in these times, that the best thing for the church is to have me go through the same thing. if other people manage or mismanage what needs to be taken care of quickly and well. >> megyn: as we watch the castle, what we understand is going to happen at 2 p.m. eastern time the swiss guard is going to walk away, just walk away, signaling that we no longer have a pope because they're the ones charged with protecting our pope and have been for 500 years, is that what is going to happen? >> that is true. and very colorful, i can't see the images right now, but if you're seeing the swiss guard who protect the pope, those uniforms were made by michelangelo, a great tradition and they said, not only do we protect the pope, but eonly protect the pope, therefore if this ere's no pope we're leaving.
john paul died in 2005, there was a period of nine days of mourning after his funeral which was 9 or 10 days after his death. there was a long stretch before they entered into the conclave. that will happen this time without the days of mourning, at some point after february 28th, the cardinals will gather in rome and assemble in the general congregations. they will gather and oversee some of the day-to-day business temporarily and that's overseen by a smaller group. they'll also gather in larger groups to discuss the challenges, the issues facing the church today. the state of the church in the different parts of the world. may have times to hear reports from different cardinals from different parts of the world. all that before they enter into the official conclave which is governed by a series of rituals. they'll actually begin the morning of the conclave with the celebration of mass. so they really gather and begin with prayer. and then they have a so long um per session into the sistine chapel where the doors are closed and locked and go in for the conclave and the voting of the se
, pope benedict xvi does have something on pope john paul ii, the catholic church experienced a 6% increase in favorability, up from 56% during pope john paul ii's tenure and that's what the survey says. >>> coming up, she beats out her husband in almost every popularity poll. now michelle obama is back on the road and we'll look at what the second term may hold for the first lady. >>> first, the latest from south africa on where the olympic star accused of murder is now a day after being released on bail. you're watching msnbc. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> more than 100 days after hurricane sand e some storm victims
he addressed you first but he and benedict would chat when benedict was waiting to see pope john paul. >> completely open. >> reporter: what was he like to talk to? >> very -- he would ask me what my interests were and how i felt and how i saw things. >> reporter: and with a sense of humor, like when benedict offered to sign widmer's copy of a book that he written which was pretty thick. >> when i gave it to him he said, you're really reading this? and i said, i'm trying. he said, it helps to do it in small steps. >> reporter: but he also had a personal crisis as a guard, spending his first christmas away from home. john paul helped him through that. >> i sort of had a meltdown and right at that moment he comes out of his apartment and he noticed and he reached out to me and he thanked me for being there and he gave me courage. >> reporter: what were you doing? were you crying? >> yeah. >> reporter: you were? >> i stopped crying but he in theed my red eyes. >> reporter: as for what's to come, the top job isn't what we think. >> the pope is the end of your life. you have to give up all
of state john kerry. paul ryan is the first republican in the ratings, then marco rubio, jeb bush and speaker boehner. is it a taste of things to come if hillary runs in 2016? >> lefty blogs may be upset at steve doocy. i've seen other things on lefty blogs. i heard that steve doocy actually has calf implants. n now, i don't have any evidence to back that up whatsoever. >> no. >> but, you know, just put a question mark at that. can we put a question mark at the end of that? >> you're referring to, of course, his own personal blog being implanted -- >> sam thought about getting calf implants because we're on a basketball team together. >> that's why he only does television from the waist up. >> exactly. >> just kind of a vanity thing. >> there is a nugget of probably something actually worth discussing here, which is our national obsession with hillary clinton and also the way women are scrutinized in the public lens. >> oh, totally. totally. >> and hillary, in particular, is an incredible sort of sign post for what we'll call the male gaze, given the scrutiny of the way she looks
. we are very grateful for him to part -- for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton , where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thanks to professor koppelman. i have a
for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton, where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thanks to professor koppelman. i have a pleasure of speaking on the panel with him befor
was very much like a battlefield, it's made a huge difference. in east philly john paul jones middle school had a reputation. >> police used to come to this school. used to be on lockdown. >> fight like these captured from a cell phone from the nearby middle school were common here, too. mold, fleas and rats ravaged the library so badly school officials had to throw away thousands of books. >> when i first came, i was pretty nervous. i thought it was going to be a little scary. >> the nickname came before the bars on the windows and doors. jones jail. >> but last september eighth grader tre'von williams says something happened. >> this became a whole new school. >> school district officials turned it into a charter school, gave it a new name and facelift and then called in the military. >> we needed to have people who are good role models, who believe in education and believe in youth development, and people that had a commitment really to america, and who else but veterans? >> i enlisted when i was 17. my parents signed for me. >> patrick's father is a vietnam vet and a purple heart recipi
the sequester. >> john: but who passed it, paul? senate majority leader harry reid kind of knows the answer to that one. >> 174 republican house members voted for this. 28 republican senators voted for this. this is not the president's sequester. >> john: you killed filibuster reform but that's another argument. mr. obama's bill. though a gang of eight in the senate is working on immigration, president obama has said he will step in if the evident fails. while some republicans accuse the president of failing to lead, a leaked white house proposal on immigration had other republicans calling for mr. obama to stay out. republican senator marco rubio insisted that "if actually proposed the president's bill would be dead on arrival in congress." a bill that he pretty much agrees with all of the contents therein and congressman ryan, like the speaker of the house saw more machiavellian mischief from the white house. >> the president on most of these issues and this one now like the others, seems to be looking for a partisan advantage and not bringing the parties together. >> john: loyal oppositi
the kind of italian curia that is the traditional source of popes until really pope john paul. and i think we'll end up with a similarly conservative pope. >> yeah, reverend al asked me during the commercial break what i thought. not that i would know anything about who's going to be the next pope. but one thing's for certain. given the last two popes' selection of cardinals throughout the world, they are all invariably quite conservative. so the next pope is going to, more probably than not, be similarly conservative. it's a bag job, the college of cardinals. they have rigged the deck. they have rigged the deck. >> but what you'll have, too -- >> spoken like a true catholic. >> you could have the first african pope. you could have the first latino pope. but ironically, those guys would be very conservative. you know, the growth of the church in africa is a very conservative movement. the same thing in latin america, although there's a bit of a protestant refirmation. he will be very conservative. >> everybody's talking about the possibility of an african pope. i just don't think it's goin
discrimination. but being a judge, and it's a pretty good job to have, think of my colleague, justice john paul stevens who remain on the court until he was 90, and is still an avid golfer and tennis player, has recently written a book, not about himself, but about the five chiefs that he had known from the time he was a law clerk until the time he retired from the court. so, next question. [laughter] >> justice ginsburg, you've had an amazing career and are leaving your legacy in the law. looking back on your life, although there's still more to do, but looking back on what you have done so far, is there anything you would do differently? >> it's a question, and i don't ask myself, and i'll give you two pieces of advice i was given in that regard. when i was a brand-new judge on the d.c. circuit, one of my senior colleagues said ruth, i've been at this business a long time, and one thing i'd like to embark to you, do your best job in each case, but when it's over, when the opinion is out, don't look back. don't worry about things that have passed. go on to the next case, and give it your all.
must be an expert in medicine. i would wonder why he assumes that he knows more than people like john or paul, the nobel prize winner in economics. and it seems to me that sequestration is more a blackmail issue. guest: again, sequestration was the mechanism used by the president, the white house, in order to get the bill passed that raised the debt limit in august 2011. if anyone's dealing with blackmail, i reference your call to the white house, please, because they were the ones who came up with this idea. the president thought it was a bad idea, had the ability to veet oh the bill in august 2011, but it was passed under his signature. he signed it and went on vacation, if you'll remember, went to his 50th birthday party, if i recall correctly. look, paul drugman and i probably disagree about almost everything except the call of day. host: the caller may have missed the introduction of you. er a doctor. give us a little bit of your background. guest: well, i am a physician. i went to the university of texas medical school at houston,graduated in 1977, did my residency in a obstetri
view her favorable. president obama second at 51%. paul ryan, marco rubio, john boehner, all far behind. joining me now karen tumulte and david goodfriend. thank you for joining me. the analysis of the seven-point dive there, if that's the accurate word here, why do you believe the approval rating is sinking from december? >> a couple of things. in december, we just come off the large presidential election where both he and his republican opponents spent inordinate amounts of money to get the point across and people weigh the two messages. mitt romney versus barack obama and now left with sort of a generic feeling of the public how do you think things are going? as you put on the screen, most americans don't feel things are going well and will blame that on an incumbent. that having been said, the president's approval ratings are still strong as you point out, strong relative to congress and historical trends. i happen to think that the biggest news out of that poll is even after the republicans tried to tar her with benghazi, hillary clinton remains unbelievably strong and i think that
championed it. it was john boehner and company and paul ryan of the so-called budget hawks. they made it so disastrous that they thought nobody could ever, ever, ever go along with this. now they reversed themselves and say let's do it. i think the american people know whose fingerprints are all over this baby. i just hope that they come to their senses beforehand and it doesn't happen. there is other stuff in the news. when we come back, jesse jackson jr. and his wife both on trial here in washington, d.c. yesterday, lynn sweet who knows chicago politics and has covered chicago politics better than anybody else alive joins us in the next segment. she was in the courthouse yesterday. she talked to congressman jackson. she'll tell us all about it. >> announcer: on your radio and on current tv, this is the "bill press show." agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying
unless they got cuts, there would have lost that the raid at the end. big loss that debate. john boehner and paul rand did a great job together. you cannot govern from that office, you but you have to be very careful about high-profile last-minute negotiations. i've worked in the white house and three administrations. the president has a tremendous institutional advantage in these kinds of fights. what republicans have to do is avoid these fights, the straps that they are laying. provide an alternative through passing legislation, just to show this is how they would govern if they had the powers of the presidency and the senate. and be careful. there are some rough edges. host: some are not strategy as far as moving the debt ceiling ahead. guest: if they had gone ahead with it, it would have been politically cataclysmic. it was the worst percival -- worst possible ground to make their point. president obama 1. i think it's absolutely crucial for the future of the country that you cannot govern from the house. some house republicans, i am sympathetic to their concerns. their enthusiasm tr
into this time of renewal. >> john allen, who gets more attention tomorrow morning, marco rubio or rand paul? >> i think marco rubio, actually, will get more attention, than rand paul, giving a tea party address, depending on what he says, could, in fact, grab some headlines. >> now, i'm going to do this in the snake order. jonathan, you get to go first. >> my sister's birthday today and my wife is pregnant with our second. i love you, honey. happy valentine's day. >> kristen? >> i also have a birthday, last time i was on the show, i wished happy birthday to my sister, now more sister heather. >> senator? >> no birthdays in my house. yesterday i joined the fix the debt campaign. about 20 plus of my former colleagues in the congressional leadership council. we had a press conference to kick off our efforts to really bring the focus back to long-term solutions for the debt. >> nia? >> i'll go with my great colleague, who i believe is the justin timberlake of politics, and that is chris cillizza. >> wow, i am taking that. justin timberlake and i are also both good at basketball. my shameless pl
starting at noon eastern on c-span radio. "meet the press" at noon. john mccain, and mark kelly, co- founder of americans for responsible solutions on guns in america. at 1:00, guests include paul ryan, castro. chris wallace and lyndsay grahnm and rand paul. "state of the union" with jack reed and chuck schumer from new york. also, the chair of the house committee john rogers. haley barber, corey booker, and donald wharl. all starting at noone aste eastn on c-span radio. you can also listen with our free apps for your iphone, android, or black burry. -- blackberry. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> i think the women were interested in politics but had no ability to express that so they were attracted to bed who were going to be politically active or were already politically active. >> i fight each of them intriguing. probably half of them because they are so obscure. i think half of these would then probably would be almost totally unrecognizable to most men and women on the street. >> c-span premiere
talking about holding up the nomination of john brennan, the president's chief counterterrorism advisor, to head the cia. and, rand paul, your colleague, who will be on after the break, says one of the things he wants to ensure is that a president can't order a drone attack against an american citizen without a judicial review. is senator paul wrong? >> well, i think the worst thing in the world is to have the courts decide who to target in the war on terrorism. courts are not military commanders, the commander-in-chief has the right under our laws and authorization to use military force to designate the enemy, and i think we need drones to patrol our borders and, we are using drones where there is really no soldiers, and, along the afghan-pakistan border but i very much believe we're at war and any american citizen who aids al qaeda should be treated an enemy combatant and not a common criminal and we have done that in every war and drones are a tactical weapon in the overall war. >> chris: when congress gets back from recess, the week after this one, you will have just five days to tr
and after. >> chris: senate republicans also talking about holding up the nomination of john brennan the president's chief counter terrorism advisor to head the cia and rand paul your colleague who will be on after the break says one of the things he wants to be sure is that a president can't order a drone attack against an american citizen without a judicial review. is senator paul wrong? >> i think the worst thing in the world is to have the courts decide who to target in the war on terrorism. courts are not military commanders. the commander in chief has the right under law and authorization to use military force to designate the enemy. i think we do need drones to patrol our borders but i don't think you need a drone to attack an al-qaeda operative within the united states. i very believe we are at war and any american citizen mo aids al-qaeda should be treated as a criminal combatant. drones are just a tactical weapon in the overall war. >> chris: when congress gets back from recess the week after this one, you are going to have just five days to try to deal with the sequester.
of the staging were a little bit of a mess. what are you looking at, rand paul? beyond marco rubio and rand paul, the other new tea party republican senator ted cruz is busy being pilloried by john mccain and other members of his own party for the way he has comported himself in his first few days in the senate. republicans, republicans are telling reporters that ted cruz is, quote, jim demint without the charm. the insult here being that jim demint was never known for having any charm. two years ahead of time there is always talk that the top republican in the senate, mitch mcconnell may not just face a general election challenge from ashley judd, he may face a tea party challenge from his own party, a named challenger already raising his profile in the state of kentucky against mitch mcconnell. the right wing pundits' fear right now is up in arms about how candidates are handle their fight. they're not on the republican side on this. the fox news channel has gotten rid of sarah palin and dick morris. they have hired scott brown and herman cain and dennis kucinich. hmm. the big headline out of
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)

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